Advanced

Advanced settings options are provided for the sake of allowing admins to tune their instance to their liking.

These are set to sensible defaults, so most server admins won't need to touch them or think about them.

Changing these settings if you don't know what you're doing may break your instance.

Settings

#############################
##### ADVANCED SETTINGS #####
#############################

# Advanced settings pertaining to http timeouts, security, cookies, and more.
#
# ONLY ADJUST THESE SETTINGS IF YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING!
#
# Most users will not need to (and should not) touch these settings, since
# they are set to sensible defaults, and may break if they are changed.
#
# Nevertheless, they are provided for the sake of allowing server admins to
# tweak their instance for performance or security reasons.

# String. Value of the SameSite attribute of cookies set by GoToSocial.
# Defaults to 'lax' to ensure that the OIDC flow does not break, which is
# fine in most cases. If you want to harden your instance against CSRF attacks
# and don't mind if some login-related things might break, you can set this
# to 'strict' instead.
#
# For an overview of what this does, see:
# https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTTP/Headers/Set-Cookie/SameSite
#
# Options: ["lax", "strict"]
# Default: "lax"
advanced-cookies-samesite: "lax"

# Int. Amount of requests to permit per router grouping from a single IP address within
# a span of 5 minutes. If this amount is exceeded, a 429 HTTP error code will be returned.
#
# If you find yourself adjusting this limit because it's regularly being exceeded,
# you should first verify that your settings for `trusted-proxies` (above) are correct.
# In many cases, when the rate limit is exceeded it is because your instance sees all
# incoming requests as coming from the *same IP address* (you can verify this by looking
# at the client IPs in your instance logs). If this is the case, try adding that IP
# address to your `trusted-proxies` *BEFORE* you go adjusting this rate limit setting!
#
# If you set this to 0 or less, rate limiting will be disabled entirely.
#
# Examples: [1000, 500, 0]
# Default: 300
advanced-rate-limit-requests: 300

# Int. Amount of open requests to permit per CPU, per router grouping, before applying http
# request throttling. Any requests beyond the calculated limit are held in a backlog queue for 
# up to 30 seconds before either being processed or timing out. Requests that don't fit in the backlog
# queue will have status 503 returned to them, and the header 'Retry-After' will be set to 30 seconds.
#
# Open request limit is available CPUs * multiplier; backlog queue limit is limit * multiplier.
#
# Example values for multiplier 8:
#
# 1 cpu = 08 open, 064 backlog
# 2 cpu = 16 open, 128 backlog
# 4 cpu = 32 open, 256 backlog
#
# Example values for multiplier 4:
#
# 1 cpu = 04 open, 016 backlog
# 2 cpu = 08 open, 032 backlog
# 4 cpu = 16 open, 064 backlog
#
# A multiplier of 8 is a sensible default, but you may wish to increase this for instances 
# running on very performant hardware, or decrease it for instances using v. slow CPUs.
#
# If you set this to 0 or less, http request throttling will be disabled entirely.
#
# Examples: [8, 4, 9, 0]
# Default: 8
advanced-throttling-multiplier: 8